Eau Queer Film Festival
Films
About Us
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October 13 to 16 in teh Davies Theater admission is free
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About Us

Eau Queer Film Festival (EQFF) is an extension of the LGBTQA Studies: San Francisco Travel Seminar immersion course at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire. As part of this course, 14 students travelled to San Francisco where they attended Frameline’s 35th International LGBT Film Festival. These students then worked together to produce this year’s film festival, which features over a dozen captivating films from the Frameline Festival. In addtion, EQFF showcases the three student-produced documentaries, Hear Me Now, Our Town and With Open Arms, that they shot while in San Francisco.

Our festival celebrates the diversity of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning (LGBTQ) communities through screening and discussing riveting documentaries, awe-inspiring features, quirky comedies, and shorts. We embrace difference, promote equality, and educate through the powerful medium of film.

This film festival would not be possible without the support of the Women’s Studies Program, the Blugold Commitment Differential Tuition Grant, Domestic Intercultural Immersion Grant, and the University Activities Commission.

This fall the Eau Queer Film Festival (EQFF) returns to the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire campus for its second year. Running from October 13th-16th in Davies Theatre, this lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer film festival will offer audiences a wide cinematic range from feature length comedies and dramas to documentaries and shorts. The purpose of EQFF is to embrace difference, promote equality, and educate through the powerful medium of film.

The film festival originated last fall as an extension of the new immersion course, LGBTQA Studies: San Francisco Travel Seminar. The course which was taught through the Women's Studies Program by professors Ellen Mahaffy (Communication and Journalism) and Pamela Forman (Sociology), incorporated a trip to San Francisco to experience its annual gay pride celebration, make documentary films, and attend Frameline, the longest running LGBT International Film Festival.

The EQFF features films that students screened at Frameline's LGBT Film Festival. In October we will showcase award winning films, including Three, Weekend, Gun Hill Road, Gen Silent, and Wish Me Away.

The opening night film, Three, is a unique a feature length drama out of Berlin. Three explores a complex love triangle between a straight married couple and their lover, a man, with whom they are both having an affair.

Weekend considers the possibilities when two opposites attract each other; they engage in conversation that reminds us of one of life's greatest aspects: love. When the weekend comes to a close will this pair be able to truly trust one another? Weekend is a film that will surprise you through its honest look at life's curve balls.

Gun Hill Road is an exploration of a male-to-female transitioning teen, who is struggling to handle the demands of his religious, unaccepting father and the social norms of gender and sexuality. The riveting scenes of transgendered experience are some of those most vivid and poignant in all of Eau Queer.

Closing night features Wish Me Away, a moving and eye-opening documentary about Chely Wright, a famous country musician from a small southern town and conservative Christian family. In 2010, Wright came out publicly as a lesbian despite facing scrutiny from a heterosexist and even homophobic industry.

The three student documentaries will screen on Saturday, October 15 at 4 p.m. Our Town (Kim Acheson, Katy Cobb, Lindsay Miklya, and Brooke Verwiel) contrasts the different realities of being queer in Eau Claire and in San Francisco; this film ends with a call to action of how to make Eau Claire a more welcoming LGBTQ community. With Open Arms (Kelly Brill, Bryton Fredrick, Katie Johnson, and Tatjana Trommershauser), examines three churches that are affirming of LGBTQ identities in San Francisco, and includes poignant reflection from its producers about the impact of religion on their lives. In Hear Me Now (Liz Albert, Katie Chaplin, Megan Chilman, and Brianna Mueller) we learn captivating stories from members of San Francisco's deaf queer community, who are reconciling what it means to face double oppression.

Join us for the Eau Queer Film Festival in Davies Theater on the UWEC campus from October 13-16th. All films are free and open to the public. To see the schedule and learn more about the upcoming films at EQFF please visit eauqueer.com or check us out on Facebook.

The LGBTQA Studies course is supported by a Domestic Intercultural Immersion Grant. This second Eau Queer Film Festival is made possible by funding from a Blugold Differential Tuition Grant and support from the University Activities Commission (UAC).

Movies by Title
Movies A to G
Movies H to O
Movies P to V
Movies W to Z
Thursday Movies
Movies for Friday
Movies for Saturday
Movies for Sunday
Click for the movie Three
Thursday 6:00PM and Friday 8:30PM
Click for the movie Three
Thursday 8:30PM
Click for the movie Three
Thursday 6:00PM and Friday 8:30PM
Click for the movie Romeos
Friday 4:00PM
Click for the movie Romeos
Friday 6:00PM
Click for the movie We were Here info
Saturday 2:00PM
Click for the movie Three
Saturday 4:00PM
Click for the movie Spork info
Saturday 6:00PM
Click for the movie Gun Hill Road info
Saturday 8:30PM
Click for movie Shorts info
Sunday 2:00PM
Click for movie Johnny and Lyman info
Sunday 4:00PM
Click for movie Gen Silent info
Sunday 4:30PM
Click here for Leading Ladies info
Sunday 6:00PM
Click here for Wish Me Away info
Sunday 8:30PM
Map of UW_Eau Claire campus

Friends of the Eau Queer Film Festival

UWEC


Department of Communication and Journalism
Department of Sociology
Women's Studies Program
University Activities Commission
Women's and LGBT Resource Center
Social Justice Learning Community (Sutherland Hall)

UWEC Student Organizations

Advocates for Choice
Forward Momentum
College Feminists
Network of Unitarian Universalist Students (NUUS)
Out Loud
Students for a Fair Wisconsin

Community Partners


AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin
The LGBT Community Center of the Chippewa Valley
Scooter's

 

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Click below to print scedule

Three
DIR Tom Tykwer 2010 Germany 119 min
German with English subtitles

Three brings us a complacent couple, Simon and Hanna, whose mundane relationship takes a series of complicated turns. Things seem to look up when Adam, a care free, confident charmer meets Hanna. Before you can count to three, he then connects with Simon without knowing the long-term relationship between them.

Three is a surprising tale of complicated relationships that cause each character to question what is politically, socially, and emotionally acceptable. With so many different possibilities spinning around one another, Tykwer brings us to a climax no one was ever expecting!  
   
Tom Tykwer is co-founder and partner of X Filme Creative Pool GmbH, a film production company based in Berlin. More recent works of his include: Run Lola Run (1998), Heaven (2002), Perfume - The Story of a Murderer (2006), and The International (2009).  

Weekend
DIR Andrew Haigh 2011 UK 96 min

Can a one-night stand become something more? Can it become a weekend two men will never forget? For Russell and Glen it has to be, an underlying fire calls for more. Russell is a man who keeps to himself. The opportunity for finding love is not on his radar, and he’s content fitting in with the straight male crowd. Glen, however, has no problem rebelling against societal perceptions of sexuality and is ready to take everything life has to offer.

As these two opposites attract, they engage in conversation that reminds us of one of life’s greatest aspects: love. When the weekend comes to a close will this pair be able to truly trust one another? Weekend is a film that will surprise you through its honest look at life’s curve balls.

Andrew Haigh has written and directed four short films and two features (Greek Pete, 2009; Weekend 2011). His work has made its way around the world including South by Southwest (Winner of the 2011 SXSW Emerging Visions Audience Award), Berlin International Film Festival, and Frameline’s International LGBT Film Festival.

Romeos
DIR Sabine Bernardi 2011 Germany 94 min
German with English subtitles

Nineteen year old Lukas is struggling to establish himself in a world of hyper-masculinity during his transition from female-to-male. Further, he is forced to live in a girl’s dorm where he feels the need to hide his transition. As Lukas finds solace in solitary, we are drawn into his attempts to fit in and learn whom to trust. After he meets Fabio, a love story ensues with some bumps along the way. The emotional tone of the film is balanced with the use of strategically placed humor.

Sabine Bernardi’s debut as a feature film director garnered her the Best Feature Film Award at the Honolulu Rainbow Film Festival. She won the Cologne Best Treatment Screenplay prize for her script, which she based on her earlier documentary film,Transfamily (2006). Romeos screened at Frameline, the Berlin International Film Festival, and the Guadalajara International Film Festival.

We Were Here
DIR David Weissman and Bill Weber 2010 USA 90 min
Saturday, OCT 8, 2pm

This eye-opening documentary chronicles the AIDS crisis in San Francisco from its onset in the early 1980’s through the use of archival footage and raw emotional interviews from four men and one woman whose lives were profoundly shaped by this epidemic. Instead of telling the political or scientific account of AIDS, We Were Here focuses on the social impact. Weissman and Weber’s film captures the response to AIDS within San Francisco’s Castro District. This film demonstrates that just as the human body must eventually succumb to disease, aging, and death, so too must a community learn to deal with catastrophe and summon the strength to rebuild and find its vitality again.

We Were Here screened at Sundance, N.Y.’s Newfest, L.A.’s Outfest, Out Twin Cities Film Festival, and the Athens, Berlin, and Helsinki International Film Festivals. It received the best documentary award at the Mumbai International Queer Film Festival.

Our Town

Produced By: Kim Acheson, Katy Cobb, Lindsay Miklya, & Brooke Verwiel

Our Town is a short documentary film that explores LGBTQ communities in two different areas - Eau Claire, Wisconsin and San Francisco, California. This film examines communities using emotional and personal interviews from LGBTQ individuals and allies, and poignant stills to capture the energies of both places. Through the contrast in the LGBTQ communities in Eau Claire and San Francisco, we learn about what elements help an LGBTQ community thrive, and how to bring those elements into other places in the United States.

While focusing on visual components, Our Town maintains a distinct human element throughout its story - those elements of sadness and those of joy. This film instills a genuine sense of support and acceptance, rather than tolerance towards LGBTQ communities. Our Town gives the audience a better understanding of queer identities, and offers to a call to action for improving the quality of life in LGBTQ communities.

With Open Arms

Produced by: Kelly Brill, Bryton Fredrick, Katie Johnson, and Tatjana Trommershauser

With Open Arms offers a different analysis of religion than the commonly told stories about the religious right's opposition to LGBTQ equality. More specifically, this short documentary focuses on affirming religious leaders who discuss ways in which Christian religions embrace members of LGBTQ communities. The religious leaders interviewed all lead congregations in San Francisco, California. Two of the three leaders are themselves part of the LGBTQ community, while the third is an ally. Interspersed throughout the narrative are candid thoughts from the filmmakers on how religion has touched their lives. With the advice of openly gay and lesbian clergy members from San Francisco, each individual filmmaker reflects on what they have personally taken away from the project.

The deepest roots of religion are supposed to be about faith, love, and compassion. Ultimately, the earliest scriptures were written long before we had our current norms about heterosexuality/homosexuality. As filmmakers we understand that people have deeply held religious beliefs. The goal of With Open Arms is to educate viewers about the possibilities of inclusive religions.

Hear Me Now

Produced by: Megan Chilman, Katie Chaplin, Elizabeth Albert and Brianna Mueller

Hear Me Now offers stories from San Francisco's deaf queer communities and their allies. The deaf queer community faces double oppression in a fast-paced, hearing, heterosexist world, which refuses to slow its pace long enough to listen, understand, and accept identities beyond the "norm". This documentary provides insight into a community that relies on their eyes rather than their ears, and yearns for acceptance instead of social ostracism. These individuals make waves of change to end their silence, and to become activists. Hear Me Now offers the passionate message to never lose your voice: keep speaking, signing, and living.

Group1
DIR David Weissman and Bill Weber 2010 USA 90 min
Saturday, OCT 8, 2pm

This eye-opening documentary chronicles the AIDS crisis in San Francisco from its onset in the early 1980’s through the use of archival footage and raw emotional interviews from four men and one woman whose lives were profoundly shaped by this epidemic. Instead of telling the political or scientific account of AIDS, We Were Here focuses on the social impact. Weissman and Weber’s film captures the response to AIDS within San Francisco’s Castro District. This film demonstrates that just as the human body must eventually succumb to disease, aging, and death, so too must a community learn to deal with catastrophe and summon the strength to rebuild and find its vitality again.

We Were Here screened at Sundance, N.Y.’s Newfest, L.A.’s Outfest, Out Twin Cities Film Festival, and the Athens, Berlin, and Helsinki International Film Festivals. It received the best documentary award at the Mumbai International Queer Film Festival.

Group1
DIR David Weissman and Bill Weber 2010 USA 90 min
Saturday, OCT 8, 2pm

This eye-opening documentary chronicles the AIDS crisis in San Francisco from its onset in the early 1980’s through the use of archival footage and raw emotional interviews from four men and one woman whose lives were profoundly shaped by this epidemic. Instead of telling the political or scientific account of AIDS, We Were Here focuses on the social impact. Weissman and Weber’s film captures the response to AIDS within San Francisco’s Castro District. This film demonstrates that just as the human body must eventually succumb to disease, aging, and death, so too must a community learn to deal with catastrophe and summon the strength to rebuild and find its vitality again.

We Were Here screened at Sundance, N.Y.’s Newfest, L.A.’s Outfest, Out Twin Cities Film Festival, and the Athens, Berlin, and Helsinki International Film Festivals. It received the best documentary award at the Mumbai International Queer Film Festival.

Spork
DIR J.B. Ghuman, Jr. 2011 USA 90 min Saturday, Oct 15th, 6pm

A Tribeca Film Festival Best Virtual Feature winner, Spork, is a unique comedic film about a teen whose worries go beyond bad hair and braces. Spork is a girl-identified thirteen-year old who is bullied because of an intersex condition that no one, herself included, really understands. When she turns to others for help with her insecurities, it’s her comrade Tootise Roll and her polo-wearing prep boy pal who are there to help guide her. Deciding that dance is the way to help gain confidence, the crew comes together to help the less-than-coordinated Spork win the middle school’s talent show. Grooving her way along with this film’s super 90’s mix-tape track, she finds her way to the top, and finally finds comfort in who she is and who her true friends are.

Gun Hill Road
DIR Rashaad Ernesto Green 2011 USA 88 min
Saturday, OCT 8, 8:30pm

This gritty drama about a Latino family plays out in the Bronx where teenager, Michael, is coming to terms with his gender identity. Aware that as a young man he feels disconnected, disjointed, and incomplete, he starts living as Vanessa. While her mother tries to be supportive, her father is initially upset by his son’s transition. Through raw and sometimes unsettling images of Vanessa’s transition process, audiences are exposed to young breakout actress, Harmony Santana, who was undergoing the same gender transition while making the film. Santana stars alongside two mainstream actors, Judy Reyes and Esai Morales. Reyes known for her role in Scrubs (2001), plays Vanessa’s mother. And Morales, known for his role in La Bamba (1987), plays Vanessa’s father. Despite witnessing her physical pain and emotional strain, viewers will see that being transgendered offers empowerment and a sense of solace after years of struggle against societal norms.

Rashaad Ernesto Green’s first feature film, Gun Hill Road, played at the Frameline Film Festival, Sundance, L.A.’s Outfest, and N.Y.’s Newfest. It won the best feature film award from the Imagen Foundation.

Miserable Animals, BaldGuy, White Paper, Truth Takes Time, Genderbusters, No Direction, Fluid

Miserable Animals
DIR Desiree Akhavan, Ingrid Junermann 2011 USA 6 min

In this short comedy, a lesbian couple struggles with homophobia while fighting over who is more gay. The two directors star in the film and are complemented by Zeke, a very convincing stray dog.

BaldGuy (Skallaman)
DIR Maria Block 2011 Norway 12 min
In Norwegian with English subtitles

BaldGuy, a fun-loving musical about a young man learning to find love and acceptance within himself. What happens when his choice leads to family disappointment? Will he lose everything when he runs home to tell his family about the man he’s chosen?

White Paper
DIR Seyed Mohsen Pourmohseni Shakib 2010 Iran 4 min

In a monochromatic world, six colored children are driven out and separated for being different. Banding together, the outcasts create their own community, ridding their world of persecution and creating one that accepts people of all colors.

Inspired by a drawing found in a bottle by director Shakib, the use of colored crayons on white paper brings to light a minority struggle in a simple, but picture perfect way.

Truth Takes Time
DIR Ellie Krnich 2010 USA 12 min

A tale following Allie’s self- discovery is portrayed simply in an animated storybook. Her future is full of fear, but with the help of some close friends Allie gathers the courage to find true happiness and a sense of security in herself.

Genderbusters
DIR Sam Berliner 2010 USA 6 min
Sunday, OCT 9, 2pm (after Truth Takes Time in shorts series)

Gender fluidity is in. Being strictly “male” or strictly “female” is out. Thanks to the kick-butt antics of a group of gender-busting super heroes, gender binaries are coming down. Revolutions of respect and pride are building up. When their missions are complete, the Genderbusters will have created a safe community that welcomes those of all gender and sexual identities.

Fluid
DIR Dara Sklar 2011 USA 17 min
Sunday, OCT 9, 2pm (last in the series of shorts)

Boasting a satirical tag line of “hilariously breaking the tea/coffee binary,” this short is a powerful commentary on what it means to explore the limits and be different. Playing off the dichotomy of sexuality this film depicts a society divided into tea drinkers and coffee drinkers. When Angie gains a preference for coffee she steps outside the boundaries defined by her tea-drinking friends, and soon finds herself in a bit of trouble.

Johnny and Lyman: A Life Together (Final)
DIR Michael Chen, Paul Detwiler 2010 USA 19 min
Sunday, OCT 9, 4pm (preceding Gen Silent)

This biographical documentary shares the experiences of Johnny and Lyman, an early “out” couple in Hollywood; the struggles they faced and their triumphs over the past six decades. The interviews of both men are genuine, heart warming, and poignant. Their story tells of an astounding companionship and love that is timeless and undaunted.

Johnny and Lyman: A Life Together has been an audience choice award at several LGBT film festivals including Reeling Film Festival in Chicago and Out Film Festival in Covington, Kentucky.

Gen Silent
DIR Stu Maddux USA 70 min

Gen Silent, winner of best documentary at many film festivals including Frameline, follows a group of LGBT seniors living in Boston. Elders want to remain independent -- living in their own homes, making their own meals, and going to bed beside their partners. While some eldercare services are safe for LGBT individuals and make seniors feel at home and welcome, others are blatantly heterosexist. The fight continues when institutions fail to defend seniors against abusive treatment or neglect. With limited options these elders may hide their sexual identities in order to receive the help they desperately need. Gen Silent addresses LGBT elders’ fear of being pushed back into the closet.

Leading Ladies
DIR Daniel Beahm, Erika Randall Beahm 2010 USA 102 min

A dysfunctional dancing family made up of very different women, rise and fall in this funny film about finding yourself, finding love, and taking chances. Sisters Toni and Tasi could not be more different. Tasi is a dramatic dancing star pushed to the limit by her once famous ballroom dancing mother, Sheri. Toni is a stand-in, keeping her family afloat and living inconspicuously until she meets a fiery dancing queen, Mona, who makes her re-think her life as a wallflower.

While the relationship between Toni and Mona evolves on and off the dance floor, worlds collide and secrets explode out into the open. Meanwhile, the ballroom championship comes closer and closer. Will Toni find the spotlight and win Mona’s heart? Will Tasi make the cut? And who is going to take home the ballroom champion title?

Wish Me Away
DIR Bobbie Birleffi 2011 USA 95 min

Chely Wright: small town southern girl, child of religious and conservative parents, famous musician, but with one twist. She’s a lesbian! As the first artist in country music to openly acknowledge her sexuality, Wright made a bold move by coming out to the public in 2010. This poignant documentary shows the freedom she now has to be herself, embrace her identity, and empower others.

Winner of the Outstanding Documentary Feature at Frameline 35 in San Francisco and the Jury Award at L.A.’s Outfest Film Festival, this one must not be missed.

Codependent Lesbian Space Alien

An outer space movie like you’ve never seen before, Codependent will become a staple to your midnight viewing cravings. A lonely store clerk, Jane, finds excitement in her imagination since the store is often empty. Though her therapist thinks she’s crazy, talking about little men from space, everyone is in for a huge surprise. “Big feelings” are a problem on Zots. Too many emotions running around bring them to Earth so they can be cured. What they find though is Jane, who’s trying to figure out the female social scene herself. Lesbian dating scenes resonate to a broad audience in this out of this world comedy. A spoof like non-other Codependent Lesbian Space Alien is a fun twist on B-movies, complete with zany special effects and government paranoia.

Madeleine Olnek, veteran playwright and short filmmaker presents her first feature film with Codependent, taking low-budget sci-fi to a whole new level you’re sure to love.

Leading Ladies (official movie trailer) from Shatterglass Studios on Vimeo.

WE WERE HERE (trailer) from David Weissman on Vimeo.

GEN Silent Trailer 2.0 from Stu Maddux on Vimeo.

Episode 1: "Miserable Animals" from The Slope on Vimeo.